Spinal cord injury exercise guidelines

Researchers from the NCSEM-EM and the Peter Harrison Centre for Disability Sport together with colleagues in Canada have developed scientific guidelines to inform people with spinal cord injury (SCI) how much exercise is necessary for important fitness and health benefits.

The guidelines, developed through a series of consensus panels, are now ready to be shared with local spinal cord injury communities to determine the most suitable format and methods of distributing the guidelines more widely.

Guidelines

Professor Vicky Tolfrey
Director, Peter Harrison Centre for Disability Sport, Loughborough University

Professor Vicky Tolfrey outlines the scientific exercise guidelines for people with spinal cord injury.

Related publications

Who will be using the guidelines?

Adults with spinal cord injury

 

"For my physical and mental wellbeing I just enjoy doing exercise, it makes me feel better. I need to be as fit and strong as I can be to maintain my independence."

Peter Carruthers
Paralympian and Founder of Bromakin Wheelchairs

 

"Physiotherapists are ideally placed to helping the dissemination of these guidelines because they interact on a daily basis with patients at the start of their journey after their spinal cord injury."

Dot Tussler
Physiotherapist, Stoke Mandeville Hospital

Healthcare professionals

How the guidelines were developed

The steps in the process

Dr Jan van der Scheer
Research Associate, Loughborough University

Dr Jan van der Scheer talks about why physical activity is important for people with spinal cord injury and the process behind developing evidence-based exercise guidelines

Why we need SCI-specific evidence

Professor Vicky Tolfrey
Director, Peter Harrison Centre for Disability Sport, Loughborough University

Professor Vicky Tolfrey, UK lead researcher, talks about the importance of using SCI-specific evidence in developing exercise guidelines for people with spinal cord injury

The spinal cord injury scientific guidelines were launched in October 2017 at the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) annual scientific meeting in Dublin by researchers from Loughborough University and the University of British Columbia. Find out more about the story of the launch.

Next steps: Translating scientific to practice guidelines

How the guidelines will be translated

Dr Jan van der Scheer
Research Associate, Loughborough University

Dr Jan van der Scheer discusses why translating scientific guidelines into clinical/community practice guidelines is important and what the next steps for doing this are.

Why the guidelines need translating

Dot Tussler
Physiotherapist, Stoke Mandeville Hospital

Dot Tussler explains the importance of exercise guidelines for physiotherapists working with people with a spinal cord injury.

"People with SCI need all the information they can get in order to continue living the same, fulfilling lives they aspired to before their injuries."

Andy Barrow
Paralympian and Inspirational Speaker

Who was involved?

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